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CHESAPEAKE AREA PROFESSIONAL CAPTAINS ASSOCIATION

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RESOURCES

FOR YOUR INFORMATION...

Looking for information about a maritime-related subject? Click on the links below to explore our collection of Internet resources. You don't have to be a member to take advantage of this service. If you know of other sites that you'd like us to add to the list, please send the URL (website address) to communication@capca.net. Please note that CAPCA is not responsible for content on external websites.

Here's our list so far:

CAPCA TWEETS

CHESAPEAKE BAY

FAVORITE LINKS A TO Z

GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

          EPA

          DHS

          MD DNR

INTRACOASTAL WATERWAYS

LICENSING, MMC, LEGAL

MISCELLANEOUS

MOBILE APPS

NAVIGATION

NAVIGATION RULES

NOAA

ORGANIZATIONS

USCG GENERAL LINKS

        Recall Notices

        Safety Advisories (MSAs)

        Safety/Security Bulletins 

              (MSSBs)

        Small Passenger Vessels

VENDORS and SERVICES

WEATHER and TIDES


 

 

Guest speakers for past meetings

See the menu tabs ARCHIVE, SPEAKER ARCHIVE, drop-down tab SPEAKER PRESENTATIONS for archived PDFs of speaker presentations. There are no meetings in August and December, and the November Annual General meeting does not have a speaker.

2017

Monday, January 23:  Terry Slattery, electrical engineer and experienced mariner:10 Big Mechanical Problems That Captains Are Likely to Encounter—and How to Cope With Them. What are the biggest engine, mechanical, and electrical problems you're likely to encounter as a commercial captain? And how can you spot them and deal with them? Electrical engineer Terry Slattery, who has experienced them on the water himself, will go over the list and tell you how to determine what's wrong and what to do next. Open to the public. 

Monday, February 27:  Phillip Ruiz, veteran IT expert:How to Set Up a Website for Your Maritime Business. Thinking of setting up a website for your tourboat or delivery business? Phillip Ruiz, a veteran IT expert with broad experience in small-business and personal websites and how they function, runs through the basic choices you’ll need to make from the start, the pros and cons of each, the components you’ll need to include, and the pitfalls you want to avoid. Should you hire a professional developer—or not? Everything you need to know about starting a website, but were afraid to ask. Open to the public. 

Monday, March 27:  Denise Hanna, yacht broker: What Yacht Brokers Want from Delivery Captains. If you're a delivery captain, yacht brokers can be a lucrative source of business. What do they need, and how can you provide it? Denise Hanna, a veteran broker at Annapolis Yacht Sales, gives you an insider's perspective on what brokers consider a successful delivery. Open to the public. 

Monday, April 24:  Marc Cruder, Traveling Senior Marine Inspector, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters: Inside the Oddball Vessels on the Bay. Marc Cruder's job is to keep tabs on unusual and historic vessels—from tall ships and skipjacks to Liberty Ships and the former presidential yacht Sequoia—and make sure they're safe to operate. He recounts some of the "oddball" vessels that he has encountered on Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River, and passes along the lessons we can learn from what he found. He'll also take questions on a variety of Coast Guard-related topics. Open to the public.

Monday, May 22: Meeting. Bob Gallagher, chairman, Waterkeepers Chesapeake. The Chesapeake Bay’s riverkeepers serve as active stewards of the Bay and its many tributaries, performing a boatload of tasks from dealing with pollution problems, monitoring water quality, to trying to persuade those who use the water to do so wisely. Bob Gallagher, chairman of the board Waterkeepers Chesapeake, the area's umbrella organization, and a former riverkeeper himself, outlines what they are doing and tells how it affects captains. Open to the public. Social hour begins at 6:30Meeting begins at 7:15 p.m.

Monday, June 26: Meeting. Robert E. Sammis Jr., Business Transition Advisors. How to Enter—or Exit—a Maritime Business in Mid-Life. If you're still working and hope to use your captain's license professionally after you "retire"—or if you already own a maritime business and would like to sell it to someone else—you need to start planning for it now. Bob Sammis has advised hundreds of mariners in both categories, and offers some important tips on how to prepare for the change. You don't have to be over 40 to get something out of this talk. Open to the public. Social Hour begins at 6:30 p.m. Meeting Begins at 7:15 p.m.  

Monday, July 24: Meeting. Bryan Jackson, marine program leader, National Weather Service, Sterling, Virginia. Forecasting the Weather for the Bay and Its Tributaries. The man in charge of marine weather forecasts for the region discusses the challenges of predicting weather on the Bay, what mariners ought to know about forecasting, and what captains can do to help. Open to the public. Social hour begins at 6:30 p.m. Meeting begins at 7:15 p.m.
___________________

2016

Monday, February 1: Captain Ned Ross, Anne Arundel County Fire Department. How to equip your boat—and yourself—to cope with fire and carbon monoxide poisoning. There's a lot you can do, and it needn't be costly or complicated. Captain Ross outlines several simple-but-critical steps you can take. He'll also discuss the AAFD's marine operations unit and what it does to help rescue mariners who are in distress on the northern portion of the Bay and its tributaries. He holds a 100-ton master's license with endorsements for towing and auxiliary sail.

Monday, February 22: Captain Iver Franzen, naval architect and expert on vessel stability. How stable is your boat, and what can you do about it? It's no secret that stability shortcomings have accounted for a hefty share of accidents involving commercial vessels. But how can you tell whether your boat really is as stable as it should be? And, if it isn't, what can you do to overcome the problem and pass U.S. Coast Guard stability tests? Captain Franzen offers a plain-English rundown on the stability issue, with practical advice for skippers of small- or medium-sized vessels.

Monday, March 28: Ralph Naranjo, author and lecturer: Across three oceans—a seamanship experience. The former U.S. Naval Academy Vanderstar chairholder has moderated dozens of Safety at Sea seminars around the country and has been an adjunct lecturer at the Annapolis School of Seamanship. His latest book, The Art of Seamanship, has been widely praised as a must-read. He'll talk about how to anticipate, plan for, and react to on-the-water occurrences. Great for commercial captains and amateur boaters alike.

Monday, April 25: Victor Tufts, past president of the Maritime Education Standards Council, and Student Services Coordinator and Maritime Credential Specialist at MITAGS: The fast-changing standards for training and credentialing captains. Mr. Tufts outlines the trends and explain how they’ll affect us. Although the tightening primarily involves those with higher-end license for near-coastal waters and beyond, it’s bound to have an impact on license-holders in other categories as well. MESC has been instrumental in hammering out these new directions.

Monday, May 23: Captain John McDevitt, a Mid-Atlantic marine accident investigator who heads the National Fire Protection Association’s 302 Watercraft Standard effort. Fire on board! How to cope with the biggest threat your vessel faces. Captain McDevitt outlines what commercial captains often miss in equipping their boats with fire-protection equipment. And he offers tips on steps you can take to detect fires more quickly, control them more effectively, and make sure your passengers can avoid becoming trapped. Valuable, practical advice from a real pro. Captain McDevitt is a CAPCA member.

Monday, June 27: Stephen L. Caldwell, former director of homeland security and justice issues for the Government Accountability Office (GAO) in Washington. Professional Mariners and the Small-Vessel Threat.In 2011, the Department of Homeland Security unveiled a new small-vessel security plan designed to get professional mariners and recreational boaters involved in looking for—and reporting—suspicious activities on coastal and inland waters. Now, five years later, it’s time to take a closer look. Is small-vessel security as big a concern as authorities portrayed it? What has been done about it? And what can professional captains do to help? Mr. Caldwell has kept close tabs on the program and will tell us where things stand. 

Monday, July 25: Captain Priscilla Travis. Sailing Across the Atlantic the Hard Way—By Loading Your Boat on a Cargo Ship. What's the hardest way to sail across the Atlantic? By loading your boat on a cargo ship and having to reclaim it after the voyage. CAPCA member Priscilla Travis takes us through the challenges and trials of getting her 42-foot sloop back from Scotland after Priscilla flew home rather than accompany the sloop on board the cargo ship. As it turns out, getting the vessel here was more than half the fun—it was the only fun. The sailboat arrived in Baltimore amid a slew of containers, other small boats, and assorted bulk goods on the cargo ship, setting our heroes scurrying to gain access to the port, get the sailboat past the mountain of paperwork, and arrange for transit back to Annapolis. A hulluva sea story and lessons learned.

Monday, September 26: Commander Ed Lesane, chief, inspection division, Sector Maryland-NCR: What the Coast Guard Expects From Small-Vessel Captains. CDR Lesane discusses problems involving small commercial vessels on the Bay and its tributaries and how we can help the Coast Guard do its job. He'll also answer questions about inspections, operations, and other topics. Replaces the previously scheduled speaker, maritime consultant John H. Fewer, who is on travel. 

Monday, October 24: Todd Lochner, Esq., Wendy Kravit, CPA, and Hamilton Gale, maritime businessman. The Business of Being a Captain.Using your license as a delivery captain? Operating your own charterboat? Working for a tourboat or towboat company? We've assembled a panel of experts on legal issues, accounting and tax records, and communicating with clients to provide you with the basics (and some valuable tips) on what you need to do. They'll also answer questions about your own business needs.

Monday, November 21: Annual General Meeting. We need a quorum to hold elections and approve the 2017 budget. Please attend, network with your fellow captains, and enjoy a light meal.

Monday, December 26: No meeting in December. Happy holidays!

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 2015

Monday, January 26: David Van Nevel, chief legal officer at the Mariner Credentialing Program Policy Division at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington. Confused about the latest changes in the Coast Guard’s STCW* and national endorsements requirements for captains? Here’s a chance to get the word—directly from the Coast Guard headquarters unit that oversaw the revisions. Mr. Van Nevel will outline the 2014 changes, explain which categories of captains they’ll affect, and answer specific questions about STCW, medical certificates, and other credentialing issues. He’ll also provide insights about where Coast Guard policy is headed. By popular demand of CAPCA members. (*Standards of Training, Certification, and Watchstanding.)  

Monday, February 23: Lee Chesneau, nationally known weather expert: Assessing weather risks. How good are you at evaluating weather risks and deciding how to cope with them? Although we all like to think we can make sense out of weather forecasts, many mariners still find them perlexing. Mr. Chesneau, himself a former National Weather Service forecaster, talks about how to gather the weather information you need to know, how to analyze it, and what to take into account before you shove off. He takes us on a virtual voyage in which we combine our local knowledge with the big-picture forecasts issued by NWS and private forecasters.

Monday, March 23: John P. Hamill, first vice-president for operations and management of the Association of Maryland Pilots: A (changing) view from the pilothouse. The professional pilots who guide large ships up and down the Bay are facing new challenges as a result of increasing traffic and the industry-wide move toward larger oceangoing vessels. Captain Hamill outlines these changes and talks about what you as a captain need to know about them.

Monday, April 27John Kretschmer, veteran blue-water sailor. Blue-Water Passagemaking. Ever think about venturing into blue water, either as a captain or a recreational boater? What will you need to make the trip, and what will you face once you’re on the high seas? Captain Kretschmer, who has trained hundreds of would-be blue-water passagemakers over the past 30 years, will talk about his ocean adventures and pass along some of the lessons he’s learned from taking his vessel around the world. Call up his website at www.yayablues.com.

Monday, May 18: Bary Gately, Quantum Sails: Not for sailors only. Sailmaking—think high-tech, state-of-the-art. If you think of sailmaking as a craft reserved for wizened old sea dogs with needles and palm-protectors, you’re in for a surprise. These days it’s a high-tech business, with computerized design, robot-staffed production lines, and 21st-century materials that even non-sailors will find fascinating. Mr. Gately (yes, he spells his first name with one r) also will give us the lowdown on 10 things that captains of power-propelled vessels need to know about sailboats—for their own protection as well as that of the sailors.

Monday, June 22: Captain Sonney Forrest, president, Reel Relief Charters, Solomons Island, Maryland: The business of boating—What shoals to avoid. Thinking of starting your own charter business? Taking people fishing? Or operating a tourboat? Captain Forrest has been doing just that for more than 30 years. He offers captains-who-would-be-business-owners practical tips on what they need to get started and to run their own maritime companies, and identifies some of the business shoals that you’ll need to avoid.

Monday, July 27: Paul N. Jaenichen, head of Paul N. Jaenichen, head of the U.S. Maritime Administration. The New National Maritime Strategy: How it will affect the Chesapeake’s waterways. The Coast Guard and other federal agencies are drafting a new national maritime strategy for the nation’s major waterways, and the Maritime Administration is a key player. Captain Jaenichen will discuss what the emerging plan will mean for the Chesapeake and its tributaries, and will answer questions about key security issues and other topics.

Monday, September 28: Dr. Bill Boicourt, scientist at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (CES) at Horn Point: The real skinny about hurricanes. What do you need to know about hurricanes on Chesapeake Bay—beyond hauling out your vessel or doubling up your mooring lines? CES has been doing a lot of research on the behavior and impact of hurricanes in the Chesapeake area: how to improve forecasting; what to expect from large storms; and how hurricanes affect the whole estuary (surprise: it isn’t all bad…). Dr. Boicourt, a UMCES scientist whose job frequently takes him out on the water, will bring us up to date.

Monday, October 26: Captain Bill Washington: Okay, I’ve got my captain’s license—now what? Bill, CAPCA’s own job listings coordinator, outlines the kinds of openings available to newly minted captains; the skills and experience that are required for each; and how to go about marketing your talents. A must for those who want to use their licenses or get better jobs as captains.

____________ 

2014

Monday, March 24: David B. Kennedy, lobbyist for BoatU.S.: What's going on in Washington and how it will affect captains. To those who follow maritime-related issues, 2014 is turning out to be a routine year in Congress, state legislatures, and federal and state regulatory agencies. That is, it's pretty chaotic. Among the key questions now pending: Will Congress boost ethanol minimums for marine fuel? What changes will lawmakers make when they finally reauthorize the boating trust fund program? And how will Capitol Hill apportion the costs of dredgingamong federal, state, and private interests? Mr. Kennedy looks at the prospects for these and other issues, and tells how the expected changes are likely to affect you.

Monday, April 28: Brian Curtis, deputy director of major marine investigations, National Transportation Safety Board: The NTSB: Trends in Maritime AccidentsWhat you should know. Read the National Transportation Safety Board's new report on its investigation of the sinking of the tall ship Bounty off Cape Hatteras in October 2012, and you'll see that the federal agency doesn't mince words when it looks into the cause of marine accidents. (See https://www.ntsb.gov/doclib/reports/2014/MAB1403.pdf.) Mr. Curtis tells how his always-ready-to-deploy staff probes maritime mishaps, and sheds light on the trendssome encouraging, some disturbingthat the agency sees taking shape.

Monday, May 19: Chris Ruemke, former project manager, Coast Guard assessment of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential: Tweaking TWIC. If you think the new federal healthcare program has start-up problems, you may want to recall the launching of the TWIC program in December 2001. Under the plan, the Transportation Security Administration was to issue a Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) to all maritime workers who needed access to secure port facilities and vessels. The tamper-resistant, biometric card would enable managers to verify each person's identity and control access to these sensitive areas. But the launching was beset by a raft of glitches and malfunctions. The Government Accountability Office issued several reports criticizing the effort and recommending key changes. The latestpublished in May 2013declared that the card-reader program was unreliable, and urged Congress to reassess the effort. Captain Ruemke, who served as project manager of the Coast Guard's assessment of the program, discusses his role and the conclusions in the GAO report.

Monday, June 23: Peyton Robertson, director of NOAA's Chesapeake Bay office: Hurricane Sandy's Lessons for Chesapeake Bay. Remember Hurricane Sandy in 2012? You may want to. Peyton Robertson, director of NOAA's Chesapeake Bay office, argues that the debacle, which hit hardest in New York and New Jersey, carries some important lessons for those of us who live near Chesapeake Bay. Robertson updates the much-talked-about study that NOAA did last year assessing the handling of Sandy by authorities in the battered region, and discusses the storm's implications for our area in coming years.

Monday, July 28: Mario Vittone, former Coast Guard rescue-swimmer, now a consultant in maritime safety: Lessons for CaptainsSome of the big mistakes skippers make. All of us like to think that professional mariners are good at taking adequate precautions that prevent accidents at sea. Mr. Vittone isn't as sure about that. He has been a vocal critic of the lax practices of captains and crew members whose vessels were involved in major mishapsfrom a fishing-boat crewman who fell overboard in Long Island Sound to the tall ship Bounty, which sank off Cape Hatteras two years ago. Now a consultant in maritime safety, Mr. Vittone has seen maritime accidents from the bottom upas a Coast Guard rescue swimmer based at the USCG air station at Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Hear his no-holds-barred critiques of how skippers go wrong.

Monday, September 22: Paul H. Miller, associate professor of naval architecture and ocean engineering, U.S. Naval Academy: Autonomous (robot-driven) Vessels: Helpers or Hazards? Like the driverless cars that have been capturing the public's attention in recent months, autonomous vesselsrobot-driven boats and shipsalso are on the horizon. But skeptics abound. Will these 21st-century watercraft be helpersor hazardsfor the rest of us? Dr. Miller is an expert on this subject. With a doctorate in engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, a wealth of experience in ship design, and a raft of research in the development of autonomous surface vessels, he's up on the latest in robot-driven ships and boats. He also is a licensed aircraft pilot and merchant marine captainand an avid sailor.

Monday, October 27: Commander Scott Kelly, head of Prevention Department, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Baltimore. Maritime Security: A Coast Guard Update for Chesapeake Bay. The Coast Guard is asking all professional captains to help in identifying and reporting potential security threats on Chesapeake Bay. CDR Kelly will brief us on the maritime security program for the Bay and its tributaries and outline the role the Coast Guard wants working captains to play in this vital effort. If you have any questions about maritime security or other Coast Guard policies, here's the place to get them answered.








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Do you have a favorite boating app that you'd like to share with people who visit the CAPCA website?                                                     

Please CLICK HERE and fill out the form that pops up. We'll look over your suggestion and post it under MOBILE APPS in the RESOURCES column at the left-hand side of this webpage. 

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Please note that CAPCA does not endorse or recommend the apps in this listing. We provide it for your information so you can decide if the app is right for your use.

 

MEET ONE OF OUR CAPTAINS

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CAPTAIN ALICIA TYRELL is typical of many of our members. She spent 15 years as a biotech products developer before deciding to switch careers and become a full-time captain. She earned her Coast Guard captain's license (a 100-ton master's for inland and near-coastal waters) in 2014 and now operates water-taxis year-'round for the Baltimore Water Taxi Company. In the summer, she also works as a part-time captain for other maritime companies. 

"Before I got my license, I was working so I could afford to spend more time on the water," she says. "Now I get paid to do that." See Alicia on the Patapsco River or come meet her and other captains at one of our monthly meetings. CAPCA meetings are public and you're welcome to attend.

Got a Coast Guard captain's license? Join CAPCA today and take advantage of the many benefits that our members receive.

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Read HOW OUR JOB BOARD WORKS, and fill out the hiring form to place your ad. We'll notify our members immediately.  

CAPCA Resources

FOR YOUR INFORMATION...

Looking for information about a maritime-related subject? Click on the links below to explore our collection of Internet resources. You don't have to be a member to take advantage of this service. If you know of other sites that you'd like us to add to the list, please send the URL (website address) to communication@capca.net. Please note that CAPCA is not responsible for content on external websites.

Here's our list so far:

CAPCA TWEETS

CHESAPEAKE BAY

FAVORITE LINKS A TO Z

GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

          EPA

          DHS

          MD DNR

INTRACOASTAL WATERWAYS

LICENSING, MMC, LEGAL

MISCELLANEOUS

MOBILE APPS

NAVIGATION

NAVIGATION RULES

NOAA

ORGANIZATIONS

USCG GENERAL LINKS

        Recall Notices

        Safety Advisories

        Safety/Security Bulletins

        Small Passenger Vessels

VENDORS and SERVICES

WEATHER and TIDES